About

We are a family run business owned and managed by Harriet Crosbie-Barcroft. Harriet attended the exclusive Battle Abbey School and in her teenage years modelled in between her school time with a well known brand. It was at this point in her life that Harriet realized her real passion was always going to stay with horses. She sold her first horses at the age of 17 and quickly became a well known name in the buying and selling market. In between competing and building up Cornerwood Stud she has bridged some strong relationships between Top Breeders and Producers throughout Europe and Ireland.

Although Harriet has been privileged to have had a good start in education she is still only 21 years of age and has had to work incredibly hard to kick start her equine career she is a keen showjumper and has had to work her way up the ladder selling many of her good horses to move her career forward. She has built up the yard over the last few years and has managed to introduce a string of very exciting young horses through her ability to spot ‘a diamond in the rough’ which are now desting for the top level in showjumping. One in particular to watch is Drumiller Diamond.

Cornerwood Stud are ideally situated only an hour from Dover Port and less than an hour from Eurotunnel Ashford making us in the perfect position to promote products and business’s throughout Europe and UK as well as the direct access to contential competitions. Harriet and Cornerwood Stud were recently sponsored by Hickstead Horse Feeds and are always looking for new sponsors. Please contact us if you want to be part of a new and exciting venture.

Harriet has already competed up to 1.30 herself with many winnings and placings to her name with only 4 years of competing under her belt, she has big ambitions to be successful at international level.

Cornerwood Stud has an outstanding reputation for producing and turning out both horses and riders to a high standard combined with the fact that she regularly attends local and international events making her an ideal candidate for sponsorship. Cornerwood truly believes in first impressions!

Harriet continues to travel throughout Europe and Ireland regularly to visit the breeders and producers in order to keep up to date with exciting new horses.

Harriet has pulled together a fantastic team of staff which are extremely dedicated to their work needs. Everyone works together in a happy and professional manner.

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Our Team

As California’s Natural and organic Farming Pioneers Age, A More youthful Generation Steps In

Enlarge this imageTom Willey has farmed for many years in California’s Central Valley. His farm, T&D Willey Farms, is in the proce s of being taken over by Food Commons Fresno. Willey plans to still help, advise and mentor.Ezra David Romero/Valley Public Radiohide captiontoggle captionEzra David Romero/Valley Public RadioTom Willey has farmed for many years in California’s Central Valley. His farm, T&D Willey Farms, is in the proce s of being taken over by Food Commons Fresno. Willey plans to still help, advise and mentor.Ezra David Romero/Valley Public RadioThe generation that pioneered organic farming is beginning to retire. These farmers want what they’ve built to last. Some growers are pa sing on their farms to their kids. But not all of them have a second generation who wants to take over the family farm. That’s what longtime natural and organic growers Tom and Dene se Willeydiscovered when they decided over the past few years that it was time to retire. When the Willeys asked their kids if they wanted to take over their 75-acre farm in California’s Central Valley, they all said “no.” “They’re all pursuing other profe sions and interests in life,” Tom Willey says. “We considered a number of different alternatives over the last five years of how to hand off the farm.” The vegetable growers began working the soil in California’s Madera County in the 1980s. The Willeys are local organic and https://www.giantsglintshop.com/Doug-Kotar-Jersey natural pioneers. The idea of letting their history fade away was just too painful. “A lot of us started 30 to 40 years ago and it’s time to hand the baton to somebody else,” he says.Enlarge this imageFood Commons Fresno took over the Willeys’ food box program now under the name Ooooby a year and a half ago.Courtesy of Food Commons Fresnohide captiontoggle captionCourtesy of Food Commons FresnoFood Commons Fresno took over the Willeys’ food box program now under the name Ooooby a year and a half ago.Courtesy of Food Commons FresnoAnd besides, growing organically is actually a way for farmers to make money. “Organic is becoming very, very popular now,” he says. “It’s breaking into big conventional retailers now like Costco, Wal-Mart.” The Willeys recently announced they’re in the proce s of leasing their farm to Food Commons Fresno. It’s the same group that took over the Willeys’ food box program now under the name Ooooby a year and a half ago. Kiel Schmidt is the wholesale and development manager for the group. He says Food Commons Fresno would like to see the region become a farm-to-fork hub like Sacramento is.”Food is a mystery for lots of people and it just ends up on the grocery store shelf or on your plate, and we want to demystify that as much as po sible,” Schmidt says. Jenny Saklar and Kiel Schmidt are both on the Food Commons Fresno team. Schmidt says he would like to see the Central Valley turn into a farm-to-fork hub like Sacramento.Courtesy of Food Commons Fresnohide captiontoggle captionCourtesy of Food Commons FresnoThe person who will eventually work the Willeys’ land is natural and organic farmer David Silveira. Willey is mentoring Silveira on the ins and outs of the farm, such as checking out https://www.giantsglintshop.com/Wayne-Gallman-Jersey the soil health. “It looks like really rich, dark soil,” Silveira says. Tom Willey adds, “We really improved the tilth of soil and the workability of the soil over the years, putting all of that natural matter in there with compost.” Jane Olvera Quebe, chair of the Institute for Family Busine s at California State University, Fresno, says the Willeys are just one of many organic busine ses in California looking for succe sors. There are more than 4,000 natural busine ses in the state, and groups like California Certified Organic and natural Farmers are reaching out to hundreds of aging growers to help them with the changeover. “When it’s a family busine s, it’s not only a complicated matter, it’s also an emotional matter,” Quebe says. “The ones that are the most succe sful are where the older generations have put a high level of trust and faith in the youthful generations. That allows them to let go.”The SaltThe Family Peach Farm That Became A Symbol Of The Food Revolution Father and daughter growers Mas and Nikiko Masumoto are navigating this transition firsthand on their farm south of Fresno, where they grow natural and organic stone fruit and raisins. “Now you have this millennial generation who have a different need for compliments and this whole life-work balance,” says Mas, whose peach farm became a symbol of the food revolution in the 1980s. Nikiko is in her 30s, and she moved home to live and work on the farm several years ago, after receiving a master’s degree. She realized she didn’t want her family’s farming history in the Central Valley to disappear if her father were to pa s away. Enlarge this imageThe Golden Tate III Jersey Masumoto Family Farm in Del Rey, Calif., is going through a change in season.Courtesy of Jim Choi and Chihiro Wimbushhide captiontoggle captionCourtesy of Jim Choi and Chihiro WimbushThe Masumoto Family Farm in Del Rey, Calif., is going through a change in season.Courtesy of Jim Choi and Chihiro Wimbush”I think, Dad, you really, really do love just grinding away. And I want to stop every once in a while, and I want to pause, so there’s a huge difference,” says Nikiko. But Mas doesn’t want to just retire and hand over the farm to Nikiko. The farm is his life and he says it’s important that they work the land together, so that Nikiko can learn the reasoning behind his farming methods. At Blo som Bluff Orchards near Parlier, Calif., Bryce Loewen, 39, is currently going through a similar handover under the guidance of his parents. “If it wasn’t so lush and beautiful here and it wouldn’t be if it wasn’t an natural farm I doubt I would’ve come back,” says Loewen, who used to work as an animator. Loewen says he and his sister will eventually take over the 80-acre farm. But for some farmers, having a family member continue farming their land isn’t an option. Enlarge this imageThe Loewen family farms around 80 acres of tree fruit in Sanger, Calif.Courtesy of Blo som Bluff Farmshide captiontoggle captionCourtesy of Blo som Bluff FarmsThe Loewen family farms around 80 acres of tree fruit in Sanger, Calif.Courtesy of Blo som Bluff FarmsRichard Peterson has farmed organic stone fruit in the Reedley area for four a long time. This was his last season and now he’s retired. His kids weren’t interested in taking over the farm. So he found someone else to lease his land. “We like it because he has a son-in-law who’s involved, so that’s another young person getting into farming,” says Peterson. “It’s very hard for young people to get into farming these days because the capital investment is so great just to buy land.” The Petersons, Willeys and Loewens all chose to farm organically before it was popular and lucrative. Now they say it’s up to young people to decide how the natural industry will grow in the future.

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Harriet Crosbie-Barcroft

Owner
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Tiffany Rainton

Groom
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Crystal Rainton

Groom